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Risers Setup - The Results
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TOPIC: Risers Setup - The Results
#10844
Risers Setup - The Results 8 Years, 6 Months ago  
Try something with 2.25" risers or so! You could make a descending (or ascending) dungeon that you just pull off or put on the levels. If the riser had a raised edge it woudl even hold everything in place fairly well.
WHEE!!

Mike, I think we've started something! YOU inspired the basic riser, I tossed in the adjustable height with the collars and rods, and now Blairgb is running with it on the shortrisers and raised edge for stackers!

WOW!

On the cost front, that price was for 1/4" Acrylite (brand name for plexi), the 1" ID tube, and two 1" OD rods. It also included a tool ($8.95) for scraping the cut edges, to produce fully clear edges and, optionally, bevel them. Tenax-7R adhesive is available at most FLHS and works fine with a plain old #2 round brush.

I paid $15 cash for the cutting, and although I could have done that myself, I figured it was better to have them do it, so the cuts would be straight - CRITICAL for all cuts! it would take a minimum of a sliding-plate table saw and a fine-tooth blade; the combination would do for both the sheet plastic and the rods and tubes, if the slide plate could handle a 4' section. This assumes that you buy a full 4'x8' sheet and cut it yourself; I basically bought a 4'x4' to get my 4 2'x2' levels.

My labor was easy, except for pulling the paper off the sheet plastic; that stuff has a deathgrip that STILL has my belly sore on Wednesday night, and I did two sheets on Saturday, two on Sunday! Woof!

But it's going to be worth it, I can tell. Especially if I go back and get some clear green and clear blue films to lay over the plexi for water effects!

See ya!

Jim Kratzer
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#10845
Risers Setup - The Results 8 Years, 6 Months ago  
IO, Jim and Blairgb

Congratulations on this awesome development.

This was truly the result of a meeting of creative and inspired minds.



Oh, and Thank You. (Since table/gaming space is not such an issue anymore, I can now justify getting even more DF than I was originally planning to!) =D
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#10846
Risers Setup - The Results 8 Years, 6 Months ago  
Oh, and Thank You. (Since table/gaming space is not such an issue anymore, I can now justify getting even more DF than I was originally planning to!) =D
WW -

Thanks for the strokes! However, if you're married or otherwise partnered, I am NOT responsible for family disputes over the amount of DF purchased!
Or, as Robin Williams once attributed to Jimmy Carter, "Thank ya, yer on yer own, g'night!"

If you go overboard, be careful you don't GO overboard - on a dark and stormy night! :lol:

See ya!

Jim
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#10847
Risers Setup - The Results 8 Years, 6 Months ago  
IMPORTANT WARNING!!!

I discovered something while experimenting with the risers, using the collars & rods method.
MAKE SURE when you glue up the collars, that THEY FIT ON ALL THE RODS, ON BOTH ENDS!!!
Do this BEFORE YOU GLUE!
OR ELSE!!!
I DIDN'T and I've already snapped 3 collars, two completely off the risers, and two in several pieces.

I'm investigating a different method of assembly; I'll get back to you later.

See ya!

Jim
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#10848
Risers Setup - The Results 8 Years, 6 Months ago  
Thanks for the heads-up Jim… I’m planning on making six risers like yours for Gen-Con… Do you think if you sanded down the legs where they connect, they wouldn’t stick? I.e. no problems….

Please do post updates on progress…

Thanks,

Mike
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#10849
Risers Setup - The Results 8 Years, 6 Months ago  
Mike;

Sanding doesn't seem to help a whole lot. The funny thing was that SOME of the pieces dropped right in, on one end, but the other end would NOT go in! Rebob and I suspect the collars got 'out-of-round' when I glued them up. Also, Sili-Kroil (a WD-40 wannabe) lubricated them, but it also seems to craze, crack, and disintegrate the lucite collars! So that didn't work either.
Brace yourself; ReBob and I came up with the idea of drilling out the end of the leg 3/8", inserting a 1/4-20 threaded brass insert with 6-minute epoxy, and when it cures (overnight), use an all-thread section to connect two legs through the sheet plexiglas. Right off the top of my head I don't remember the EXACT length of the sall-thread, but you MUST match that to the length of the two inserts and the thickness of the lucite.
When drilling the holes, make sure they're centered on the end of the leg, and NO DEEPER than the length of the insert!
When installing the brass insert, the best way is to thread it onto a piece of all-thread, with the end of the all-thread flush with the end of the insert, and spread epoxy onto the threads of the brass insert, but NOT ANYWHERE ELSE! Set the brass in the hole, unscrew the all-thread, and turn the brass @1/4-turn (it has a screwdriver slot in the outside end). That spreads the epoxy evenly around the hole, and helps prevent air pockets. Don't let the insert extend out of the hole; it must be flush.
Give it an overnight cure and it should be ready to go. Remember you'll need to drill and insert BOTH ends of most of the legs, if not all of them, to be able to stack levels.
Eventually, I'm going to get pictures of this process posted. ReBob and I only did one set of legs this weekend because Lowe's was short of inserts and all-thread.
Oh, well.

See ya!

Jim
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#10850
Risers Setup - The Results 8 Years, 5 Months ago  
Jim--you mentioned a "sliding-plate table saw" for cutting plexi sheets... I can only assume that the table top (or a portion thereof) literally "slides" with the material when it's being run through the saw... is that correct? Could you cut acrylic on a standard (10") table saw with a fine toothed blade?

One of the blokes at the local DIY told me that you'd want to cut the plastic "as quick as you can to avoid discoloration or melting." Does that sound right? I always assumed you'd want to do a little bit at a time to avoid melting or discoloration but I've never tried it so I have no clue.
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#10851
Risers Setup - The Results 8 Years, 5 Months ago  
Jim--you mentioned a "sliding-plate table saw" for cutting plexi sheets... I can only assume that the table top (or a portion thereof) literally "slides" with the material when it's being run through the saw... is that correct? Could you cut acrylic on a standard (10") table saw with a fine toothed blade?

One of the blokes at the local DIY told me that you'd want to cut the plastic "as quick as you can to avoid discoloration or melting." Does that sound right? I always assumed you'd want to do a little bit at a time to avoid melting or discoloration but I've never tried it so I have no clue.

Okay, here we go.

'Sliding-plate table saw' is exactly that; a standard table saw that has an add-on plate on the table that covers the entire table-top and has a slot for the blade, an EXACTLY 90-DEGREE PERPENDICULAR push guide bar at the operator end, and guide bars on the underside that mate with the guide slots in the table top. They usually aren't found as factory accessories on table saws, but a good woodshop engineer can build one fairly easily.
The alternative is a 'panel saw', which is usually found either as a vertical-type at home centers such as Home Depot or Lowe's, or a horizontal one, which is usually found in custom woodshops. I used to run one at my last job but two. They are a total PITA to set up accurately, but once set, unless they get slammed around with stacks of particle board or plywood, or are really abused by their operator, they stay accurate.
Yes, you can cut acrylic on a standard 10" table saw - but make sure that sucker is acurate and square, or you WILL CURSE THAT MACHINE - I know, I once found out the hard way!
The local DIY bloke is exactly right; as fast as possible or that blade will melt plastic, and gum up the works something terrible! That's the nice part of the horizontal panel saw; it will zip through 1/4" or 1/2" Plexi like a hot knife through butter - literally! The bad part of a horizontal panel saw is that the cheapest price I ever found for one was a used unit with a max size of 5' x 9', 1 1/2" stock, for just under $50K - and that was considered a bargain! Not to mention the fact that it was 12' x 12' footprint in the shop, MINIMUM space required, and took 408 VAC power, 3-phase.
So much for sticking it in the basement of Mum's house, eh?
Also, I discovered that when drilling the 3/8" holes in the posts, again, as fast as you can accurately feed the work.
Yeah, I know, it's a lot of work, but this seems to be the best way to do it.

See ya!

Jim
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