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A Dungeons and Dragons Documentary
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TOPIC: A Dungeons and Dragons Documentary
#20057
A Dungeons and Dragons Documentary 8 Years ago  
jackattack,

This information will make a notable improvement in the descriptive quality and subtle delivery throughout my game.

And yes, I will follow up on the links as well.

Many thanks.

Steve
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#20058
A Dungeons and Dragons Documentary 8 Years ago  
Steve - your actually confusing Archeology and Anthropology...while I have a degree (and much interest & knowledge) in the latter - I am a hobbyist in the former but sadly I'm not much of a crypt expert per se. I have travelled and vissited (and studied) some archeological sites pretty extensively - but its hit or miss. I've been to a great many Mayan ruins, Greek and other (Roman, Hitite, Lycian, Armenian, Uraturan etc) ruins in Anatolia, Roman ruins in Italy, France & Germany, and also a great deal of various American Indian stuff (4 corners area - Mesa Verde, Chaco Canyon other stuff) in the Southwest etc. I've tried to incorporate a great deal of this as well as other aspects of my studies of ancient civilizations - not only architecture but culture & beliefs (all fit within a rather twisted interpretation of Morcock's multiverse with perhaps some Amberish overtones to (levels of) reality (and god stuff0 as well...all still a massive (lifes) work in progress...when i find time for it...(like when I'm relaxing at the beach on vacation or such). And while I do a good job of simulation (& artistic creation) I don't think that I quite get to the level you might be implying or attempting to achieve yourself (in regards to your interest in making tombs as realistic as possible)...and my only real expertise concerning dust is in watching it accumulate on wine bottles in my cellar!

Oh and jack - good point regarding mechanical traps (that I tend to follow in my campaign)...however don't forget MAGIC! lol With such practically anything is possible eh?
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#20059
A Dungeons and Dragons Documentary 8 Years ago  
This reminds me of something in one of my campaigns once. I had some blocks in one room that had to be transported to another room for something or other. The intervening room was full of water. The blocks were to be made of sodium. As I sat down to calculate how much sodium would do how much damage, I thought to myself "Heck, this is a fantasy world!". I renamed the blocks to explodium and chose my own damge based on the character levels I was running through.
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#20060
A Dungeons and Dragons Documentary 8 Years ago  
Steve - your actually confusing Archeology and Anthropology...
Hehe,

I think the reference to Indiana Jones, a severe case of tunnel-vision and some wishful thinking on my part got the better of me that time! :D


As for the level of realism - I am only really trying to include some additional, descriptive "specifics" -including any phoemonema that would allow me to enhance the descriptions and atmosphere within my campaign settings with a reasonable degree of accuracy.

That being said, my intention (as far as gaming is concerned) is just to improve upon my provision and delivery of information as a DM. The style of game I run (as mentioned previously) plays into my strengths and will not change.


BTW,

I recently finished a epic series of (8 or 9) historical fiction books that I stumbled onto accidentally. They are by Jack Whyte and it is the "Dream of Eagles" series. I COULDN'T PUT THESE DOWN! I suggest this series as I felt it really "breathed life" into a period of time (spanning four generations) that was rich in details, involved a wide range of cultures and locations/settings and how they all interacted throughout the time of the Roman withdrawl from Britain. I think you may really appreciate this series.

Steve
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#20061
A Dungeons and Dragons Documentary 8 Years ago  
Check out the "Archer" series by Bernard Cornwell. Also, very, very good.
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#20062
A Dungeons and Dragons Documentary 8 Years ago  
Oh and jack - good point regarding mechanical traps (that I tend to follow in my campaign)...however don't forget MAGIC! lol With such practically anything is possible eh?
That's why I said "mechanical" -- the rules system I play under now makes distinctions between magical and mechanical devices, and actually requires two different skill sets to detect and manipulate either -- I'd hate to think how it would handle a mechanical trap with magical aspects, like resetting itself once sprung!

While magic can do anything, engineering can't -- perpetual motion is impossible, and energy expended cannot be recovered. In a low-magic or historical setting, traps have to be mechanical (or chemical), and therefor follow the rules of physics and engineering. At least, closely enough that your rules-lawyers don't waste twenty minutes insisting that something couldn't possibly happen.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Regarding the water/sodium trap, a possible variation on that theme is phosphorus and oil. Phosphorus burns on contact with air, but air is required for combustion, so lack of air prevents burning -- which is a roundabout way of explaining that phosphorous can be submerged in a flammable substance without igniting. So if a container full of oil, with bits of phosphorus at the bottom, is drained, it will ignite when the level drops low enough to expose the phosphorus.

Fill a room about a foot deep (or more) with oil (or water, with a layer of oil floating on top), and put a lever or valve or trigger in the middle of the room that will open drains in the floor. When the phosphorous on the floor is exposed, it will ignite the oil and fill the room with fire. (If you use the water-with-oil option, a neat way to get around the trap is to have some kind of water-breathing magic available (potions found early in the adventure, or a set of single-use medallions in a chest), and burn off the layer of oil while the party sits safely underwater.)
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#20063
A Dungeons and Dragons Documentary 8 Years ago  
This reminds me of something in one of my campaigns once. I had some blocks in one room that had to be transported to another room for something or other. The intervening room was full of water. The blocks were to be made of sodium. As I sat down to calculate how much sodium would do how much damage, I thought to myself "Heck, this is a fantasy world!". I renamed the blocks to explodium and chose my own damge based on the character levels I was running through.
Okay, pf, so how DID they get the blocks next door? Now you got ME wondering!

Jim
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#20064
A Dungeons and Dragons Documentary 8 Years ago  
Wow that was a pretty cool vid... will check them all out once I find the time..thanks for sharing that.
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#20065
A Dungeons and Dragons Documentary 8 Years ago  
This reminds me of something in one of my campaigns once. I had some blocks in one room that had to be transported to another room for something or other. The intervening room was full of water. The blocks were to be made of sodium. As I sat down to calculate how much sodium would do how much damage, I thought to myself "Heck, this is a fantasy world!". I renamed the blocks to explodium and chose my own damge based on the character levels I was running through.
Okay, pf, so how DID they get the blocks next door? Now you got ME wondering!

Jim

I almost forgot how this turned out...

The blocks were covered in a paraffin type of substance that would wear off in 1d6 rounds in the salt water.
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#20066
A Dungeons and Dragons Documentary 8 Years ago  
Just wanted to say that I think it's kool how we all play variations of the same game/s and that it also changes depending on who the players are and also eventually our games also change as we ourselves grow and evolve...my first D&D games went something like: "I kill em all and search their pocketsis!" true hack and slash fun...but as I got older and kept playing and designing worlds, I got more interested in a whole bunch of stuff that school couldn't get me interested in...like history, economics, math, etc...

I have always thought that some form of D&D could be great in school to teach these and many other subjects...
Stefan
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#20067
A Dungeons and Dragons Documentary 8 Years ago  
It's funny. The games I end up running at cons that I get good feedback on generally have very little combat. Instead, they've turned into almost something like a mystery thriller. I've managed to have quite the time with these - folks get sucked into role playing w/o having to be "over the top".

Stefan, are you planning on going to Origins? I'm going to make it out there this year.
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