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Cases for transporting?
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TOPIC: Cases for transporting?
#9946
Cases for transporting? 8 Years, 11 Months ago  
I Have Definately "Fantasized" Moding Some DF, But Have Not Attempted it todate... Though the Dremel would be a Good and Useful Tool for Such...

Can Anybody Reccomend a Good Cutting Blade for the Resin?

MLV-

Believe it or not, when I cut up a DF piece (with LOTS of second-thoughts BEFORE blade hits resin!), I use an old Dremel jig-saw. It gives a smooth cut, and although Wereweasel is 100% correct about resin dust (and make SURE you wear a dust mask! That stuff will fill your lungs like powdered pneumonia!), the jigsaw seems to hold down the blow-around. However, my saw is old enough that it doesn't have a dust blower or vacuum nozzle; I think the newer ones have a nozzle you can attach to a shop vacuum and suck that dust right out of your way!
If you don't have a power jigsaw (NOT a hand-held one, a tabletopper!), use a vise and either a razor saw such as an X-Acto, or a fine-blade coping or hand jig saw. Of course, if you already HAVE a good diamond blade for a Dremel hand-held, go ahead and use that, by all means. But remember the dust cloud and the mask! You could also use a little water in the kerf, like you do when sanding a plastic model; that will also help reduce dust, and also keep the saw kerf clear. But with that, remember the idea of 'power wash and shower spray'.

See ya!

Jim Kratzer
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#9947
Cases for transporting? 8 Years, 11 Months ago  
These are ALL Excellent Ideas... Thanks Folks... Now... For a Workshop...<Chuckle>...
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#9948
Cases for transporting? 8 Years, 2 Months ago  
On Cutting the DF resin pieces:

Has anyone tried a jewelers saw for cutting pieces? I want to try it but I would like to know if anyone else
has tried it before a attack one of my pieces.

I am a lot more precise with that than I am with my flex shaft. I am not overly fond of cutoff disks (I want to use thin ones
so they don't take away too much material, but they snap too easily). I also have the same concern on grinders with buildup
and I would not know how to use a grinder to get a perfectly squared corner.

A jeweler's saw is a frame with clamps to hold very thin blades. You drill a tiny hole through, thread the blade in and clamp it
taut in the saw. Goes pretty fast with the thin blades (through metal anyway, its a little slower through plexy). Actually I just
checked and it is very similar to a coping saw. jkratzer: have you tried any specific blades with it?

I have blades for cutting metal and I have blades for cutting plexy-glass. I think the plexy-glass blades would work but if
not I also have diamond saw blades that will cut rock up to corundum (mohs hardness 9). I would rather not gunk up my
diamond blades if the plexy-glass ones will do.

I am also curious as to how people are partially gouging into walls and floors. I have drill-press/router clamp for my
flexshaft so I can control the depth on a flat piece if I can find the right tip.

Any thoughts?

Serra Angel
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#9949
Cases for transporting? 8 Years, 2 Months ago  
Serra -

For cutting a DF piece completely (such as when I chopped the 'vertical off a MM T-intersection), I just use the standard metal-grade blades in my Dremel jig-saw. They're thin enough that I worry about breaking one halfway through a piece, so that's not a problem. They're fine-toothed enough that they give a good, smooth cut; I usually don't even have to sand the cut, unless I goofed and had to correct the cut path.
For partial-bores, such as to create alcove niches and stuff like that, a drill-press arrangement with a depth lock is perfect. I suggest a round or spade bit, carbide or HSS, medium speed rotation, and slow feed. Don't be shy about drop-and-lift action; y'know, where you lower the bit to the work, cut a little, lift the bit, check the cut, lower the bit, cut a little, lift the bit, check the cut, etc. etc., until you've got the desired results.
Consider wet-drilling, both for lubrication and debris removal, and to reduce airborne dust. Resin dust can be toxic under certain circumstances, so safer is better than sorry. WEAR A DAMN DUST MASK! Let some idiot be King Kong; YOU wear the mask and survive to game at 90!
Keep mid-size jewelers' files handy; not the little bitty ones, but the 5-6" long blades, that can handle a little heavy work. Properly used, they are faster than jewelers files, but still more precise than full-size shop files. Unless you are laser-precise, DO NOT try to use the flex-shaft for file-style clean up! Those suckers can get away from you faster than you can scream "AW, S&*)!! I messed it up!"

That's about all the pointers I can give you on modifications. Oh, sorry, one more; as the Scottish tailor once said, "Measure twice; cut once." Replace measure with PLAN and it still works for us.

See ya!

Jim
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#9950
Cases for transporting? 8 Years, 2 Months ago  
Thanks to jkratzer for the tips. Sounds like my metal blades should be fine then. I don't worry about breaking
them as much, they break all the time and I buy them in packs of 100. I will have to go looking for a carbide
spade bit. Actually I had another brain-wave for taking off a whole wall at the base (such as removing the inner
curved wall on the curved passage section for building a large round wizard tower). I also have a 4 inch and a
6 inch wet saw with diamond and carbide blades for slicing tile or rock slabs. Both use a water based lubricant
and have good splash shields. Too big for windows but great for long straight cuts. If I try it I will post how it
went.

I make jewelry as a hobby so I have worked with more that a few nasty polishing compounds (jewelers have
scary statistics on stomach cancer because of ingesting tripoli and polishing compounds). I use eye, and ear
protection and use a good filter mask when using the flex shaft. Think I might set up a collection box to work
in similar to the one I sometimes use when drilling and rough sanding jewelry. That way I can cut down on the
dust all over my work room (its not good for my kitties to be tracking through it). For anyone who has not seen
one its basically a small plastic box with arm holes on both sides. Just sweep or wash it out periodically. You can
get them from jewelry suppliers or go to a store that sells plastic or acrylic boxes and make you own. Mine was
converted from an old counter top acrylic display case from the hobby store I used to work for a long time ago.
It has a sliding top and is about 14 inches square. I just cut 2 round holes in the side and stretched fabric across
the outside with slits (to further prevent dust escaping).

I like your example of chopping the T section. If I took the floor and wall I could create hall entry into a room
which would be cool.

Stefan must cringe sometimes when he looks at these posts.

Thanks

Serra Angel
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#9951
Cases for transporting? 8 Years, 2 Months ago  
Serra Angel,

Welcome to the boards!
Please be careful when cutting anything, and yes, please wear a mask, Resin is very harmful for your lungs I am sure! I do not condone any such dangerous activities involving any of our products.

That being said, the conversions I have seen (and collected) are quite inspiring:)

No cringing here.
Stefan
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#9952
Cases for transporting? 8 Years, 2 Months ago  
Actually its your practical pieces that make such a good base to mod from. The specialty pieces are great
but would be useless without a good base set to show them off with. I don't even like to put too many of
your fancy pieces (fantasy floors, mermaid fountain ...) in any one room so what I do put in will stand out.

Some of these mods are fantastic but would never be practical from a mass production point of view.
Actually the cell mods and spike mods that I have seen from bombanat would make great editions
to a traps III (hint hint hint). I think those would make practical pieces and you need multiple of
them to set up a good scenario. Just think how cool if you could work out a sliding in spiked wall
section for a death room (like the swinging/slamming doors/walls in "Traps!"). 4 of those make a
20x20 death trap room. Even cooler if the spikes could retract but I am sure I am asking to
much there. And the dungeon cell walls and corners with the base pieces for elaborate
cells. I bet there are some other great ones from him. The flame wall passage on ebay just closed
and it looks like a practical edition to a traps set as well. I loved the wall of fire passage too but
I don't know what material that was and if it would be practical for mass prod. Practicality vs art.
Always the dilemma.

I looked at a lot of options before DF and the major problems were a either too plain (and always unpainted)
or fancy specific pieces without a good way to tie them all together or use them for different purposes.
It is the richness of the set that has me so inspired. And has eaten up so much of my money.

Keep up the great work.

Serra Angel
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#9953
Cases for transporting? 8 Years, 2 Months ago  
About that sliding spiked wall. Grooves would show in the floor but it's the only way I can think of to do it.
The wall would have to be dove-tailed into a track on the floor sealed at both ends to prevent it from
sliding out. Maybe sealed at one end and open at the other so you slide it on the way you mount the
slamming doors. Yeah that way its also reversible. Start with the smooth side showing then reverse
for the spikes revealing them selves. That would be the solution to retraction too. One side has just
holes and the other has the spikes. Actually a 4" wall section for this would be really sweet. Hmm. I
have some really tiny carbide bits for cutting prong seats that would work great for carving a
track into an existing piece. If I cut off a wall and add metal guides I bet I could make this work.
OK now I am really excited.


Serra Angel
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